Filter by type:

Sort by year:

Mobile Learning as Pratt’s ‘Linguistic Utopia:’ Leveraging Mobile Devices to Democratize Composition Instruction

Robert N. Calton
Conference Papers Conference of College Composition and Communication, Summer. Cincinnati, Ohio. 2017.
image

Abstract

This presentation proposes ways in which we can better design, deliver, and assess mobile learning environments for a diversity of students in composition classrooms. The emerging scene of using mobile devices for composition instruction is ripe for inclusiveness, and can be considered an iteration of Mary Louise Pratt’s “linguistic utopia.”

Examining Roles of Mobile Technology in Writing Centers

Robert N. Calton
Conference Papers Southern Illinois University Writing Center Conference, Carbondale, IL. 2015

Abstract

Although a substantial amount of research has examined the roles of computers and other traditional digital media in writing centers, far less has examined how mobile devices fit into those spaces. Although there are positive consequences of integrating mobile devices into writing centers, there are likely implementation issues as constant development and monitoring may be required. In this presentation, I discussed what the space of mobile technologies might look like for writing centers, and address some challenges of it.

The Emergence of Open-Source Writing Instruction in Mobile Environments

Robert N. Calton
Conference Papers Conference of College Composition and Communication. Indianapolis, IN. 2014.
image

Abstract

I see mobile devices as, first and foremost, open communication technologies. Therefore, I think it natural to believe that mobile instruction should be open sourced to the learners so that they may help build their knowledge community. In this presentation, I discuss the merits of open sourcing the code for future writing instruction mobile applications. I present a model of how this might look across institutions (who may want to develop their own particular "brand" of writing instruction), wherein a common app framework is shared by "eduvelopers" (those who fill simultaneous roles as educators and developers).

The First Generation of Mobile Writing Labs

Robert N. Calton
Conference PapersMidwest Writing Centers Association Conference. Skokie, Illinois. 2013.

Abstract

Although a substantial amount of research has examined the constructs of warmth and competence, far less has examined how these constructs develop and what benefits may accrue when warmth and competence are cultivated. Yet there are positive consequences, both emotional and behavioral, that are likely to occur when brands hold perceptions of both. In this paper, we shed light on when and how warmth and competence are jointly promoted in brands, and why these reputations matter.

Misreading Mobile Media Machines: An Apologia of the Smartphone.

Robert N. Calton
Conference PapersIndiana College English Association Conference. Evansville, Indiana. 2013.

Abstract

As composition programs continue to wrestle with the inevidable presence of mobile devices in their classrooms, many have taken arms against them by crafting anti-smartphone policies in their syllabi. This phenomenon may come from the negative perceptions of those devices as distractions, incompatible with the activities that go on in the classroom. This "misreading" of mobile technology is disasterous, and does not take into consideration their place in contemporary education. This presentation/paper illustrates ways in which these devices have been marginalized in composition courses and suggests ways in which they are compatible with contemporary pedagogies. I offered several practices that might help boost the perception of these devices by bringing them out of students' pockets and into the classroom in targeted and meaningful ways.

Pocket OWLs: Moving Towards Mobile Writing Labs.

Robert N. Calton
Conference Papers7th Annual AEGIS Conference. Carbondale, Illinois. 2013.

Abstract

This presentation discusses mobile devices in the context of writing centers. Specifically, I explored how this technology might be used to augment contemporary writing center practices such as online tutoring, resource management, and connectivity. I described several features of what a "mobile writing lab" might include, and how those features could be used in assessment of the writing center, its clients, and its services.

Dwelling in Disciplines (Panel)

Robert N. Calton, Brian J. Stone
Conference PapersNational Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing. Chicago, Illinois. 2012.

Abstract

This panel's theme was working with Writing In the Disciplines (WID) pedagogies for first-year composition students and remedial, adult literacy students. My presentation dealt with how digital modalities of writing may help encourage disciplinary knowledge by having access to spaces that serve as both research and composition environments such as smart word editors, course management software, and encylopedic plugins for word processing programs. I discussed how knowledge transfer might be represented among students who use these technologies, and ways that we as educators might capatalize on those technologies.

Representing Classical Traits of a Rhetoric-Based Education in Digital Writing Instruction Environments

Robert N. Calton
Conference PapersConference of College Composition and Communication. Las Vegas, Nevada. 2013.

Abstract

This presentation discussed how a classical education of rhetoric might be represented in digital writing instruction environments such as synchronous tutoring spaces, online "share spaces" and collaborative, real-time document editors.

Burke's Digital Parlor: An Evaluation of Dialogic Hypertext Elements

Robert N. Calton
Conference Papers6th Annual AEGIS Conference. Carbondale, IL. 2012.

Abstract

This presentation discussed Kenneth Burke's famous "Parlor Metaphor" might be understood through the lens of hypertext as represented in Landow's book "Hypertext 3.0." Discussions of shared creative spaces (i.e. Storyspace) and collaborative knowledge bases (Wikis) demonstrate Burke's Parlor in action.

Facilitating Multimodal Online Student Collaboration in FYC Programs

Robert N. Calton
Conference PapersPre-Semester Workshop. Carbondale, IL. 2012.

Abstract

This was a workshop for graduate assistants in which I demonstrated how they, as instructors, might promote collaboration with their students by using digital tools such as Google Documents and YouTube.

Wread the World: A Hypertext Perspective on the MMORPG Platform

Robert N. Calton
Conference PapersRISC Showcase. Evansville, IN. 2009.

Abstract

This presentation discussed collaborative narration in a digital multimedia space called NexusTK. Users in this space collaborate on community-based events and build the space's narration together through user-user and user-community interactions. My discussion centered around questions of how users guide each other in this space to create collaborative texts, move public events forward, and share research towards in-game activites.